'Molecules' Special Issue

October 23, 2019

The special issue of Molecules "High–Pressure Behaviour of Solids: From Molecular Species to 3D-Framework Materials" is now online!

 

 

This Special Issue of Molecules aims to cover a broad range of high-pressure investigations on molecular up to three-dimensional framework materials, focusing on high-pressure behaviour and the resulting properties or chemical changes. In the case of molecular materials, high-pressure studies reveal important intermolecular interactions for maintaining stability within each phase. Zeolites, coordination polymers as well as metal–organic frameworks are increasingly studied under pressure to investigate pressure-induced distortions that are of great importance for understanding phase stability; accessing interesting properties, such as negative linear/area compressibility; and finally, studying adsorption behaviour through the inclusion of the pressure-transmitting medium. The highlighted physical properties induced by pressure include spin crossover, luminescence, and piezochromism. Pressure can also be used to synthesise new materials, for example, by triggering the polymerisation reactions of molecular species. 

 

 

Over the last year Dr. Ines Collings (Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology), Prof. Miklos Kertesz (Department of Chemistry and Institute of Soft Matter, Georgetown University, Washington) and I been bringing together a special issue as guest editors. We were delighted with the quality of papers submitted and the variety of research included. In particular we thank Molecules for allowing us to support early career researchers with article processing charge discounts and waivers. 

 

 

 

 

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Andrew Cairns | Department of Materials, Imperial College London
a.cairns [at] imperial.ac.uk | +44 (0)20 7594 9528